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Wednesday, April 15, 2020

Engaging with Indigenous communities

No seats available.

You may join a waiting-list for this workshop.

Schedule: Wednesday, April 15, 2020, 01:00 PM – 03:00 PM
Location: McPherson Lounge
Instructors: Jaimie Kechego
As Indigenization is the process of bringing together Indigenous knowledge systems and approaches with those of the mainstream academy, it is critical that this work be done in partnership with Indigenous people. If learning is to occur in relationship, it is essential for curriculum developers to build relationships and work together with Indigenous people. In this session, we will begin to explore how to build relationships with Indigenous people in respectful and meaningful ways.

Friday, May 15, 2020

Incorporating Diverse Sources of Indigenous Knowledge

No seats available.

You may join a waiting-list for this workshop.

Schedule: Friday, May 15, 2020, 01:00 PM – 03:00 PM
Location: McPherson Lounge
Instructors: Jaimie Kechego
As you develop curriculum, keep in mind that to decolonize teaching and learning, it is critical that Indigenous voices be brought to the forefront by including Indigenous success stories, Indigenous cultural approaches, and Indigenous-led research. In recent years, there has been much discussion about what counts as an Indigenous perspective and what is and isn’t appropriate to be shared and used. In this session, we will explore these issues and provide you with some guidelines to consider when navigating choices about Indigenous content. We will also explore the importance of local knowledge and the role that curriculum developers can play in supporting Indigenous language revitalization.

Friday, May 29, 2020

Developing Awareness of One’s Own Role in Indigenization and Reconciliation

Schedule: Friday, May 29, 2020, 01:00 PM – 03:00 PM
Location: The Oak Room, Vanier Hall
Instructors: Jaimie Kechego
In the previous sessions, we learned about the exclusion of Indigenous knowledge from academia. This exclusion and the parallel privileging of Western knowledge above other systems of thought are examples of systemic oppression. In this section, we will explore the concept of systemic oppression and ask you to reflect on your positionality within the system of oppression that exists in the world today. This will help to inform the role you play in Indigenization of the curriculum. Understanding and promoting an anti-oppressive approach is critical to supporting the work of Indigenization.

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Promoting Systemic Change

Schedule: Wednesday, June 24, 2020, 01:00 PM – 03:00 PM
Location: McPherson Lounge
Instructors: Jaimie Kechego

Now that you have worked through the preceding sessions, you are probably beginning to get a sense of what indigenization means to you. Or maybe the perspective you had when you started this guide has been affirmed. We hope you have learned along the way and are more confident about how you will continue your work to introduce Indigenous perspectives into your curriculum, not just to serve Indigenous students, but to serve us all.

As you engage in the work of Indigenizing curriculum, you will find there are limits to what can be done through curriculum alone. Holistic transformation of the university will involve systemic change, including policies, practices, and organizational culture. In this session, we explore how you can contribute to systemic change as a curriculum developer.

Self-paced and other workshops

POSTPONED - Meaningful Integration of Indigenous Epistemologies and Pedagogies

No seats available.

You may join a waiting-list for this workshop.

Schedule: (Self-paced)
Location: The Oak Room, Vanier Hall
Instructors: Jaimie Kechego

This workshop will be rescheduled at a later date due to the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19).

Indigenization of curriculum requires much more than adding Indigenous content. In an education system that has, since its inception and into the present day, valued Western ways of thinking almost exclusively, Indigenization of curriculum requires us to bring Indigenous ways of thinking, being, and learning into course design. This session will provide a discussion of Indigenous epistemologies and pedagogies and how these can be interwoven in curriculum design and development.