Centre for Teaching and Learning
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The Centre for Teaching and Learning sponsors and facilitates an ongoing series of workshops focussing on the teaching and learning issues that impact on student engagement and the student experience at the University of Windsor. These free events are open to the whole University community and facilitate discussion about strategically important teaching and learning issues for the University.

Past offerings

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Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Framing Effective Teaching: From Competence to Excellence

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Wednesday, April 15, 2009, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Location: Past Workshop
Instructors: Stephen Bostock

How do you know that you are an effective teacher? What are the competencies of an effective university teacher, and how can you demonstrate them? What is recognized as excellence in teaching? How can you plan to develop professionally towards excellence at your own pace?

In this interactive session, Dr. Stephen Bostock lead a series of activities exploring models for assessing teaching at all levels of experience and expertise, from graduate student to full professor to innovative leader in higher learning. Based on frameworks broadly applied to post-secondary teaching and learning in the United Kingdom, this session offered insights into how other countries approach professional development in teaching and learning, as well as a practical exploration of a framework readily adaptable to the distinctive practices of specific disciplines.

Friday, September 25, 2009

Research and Teaching Synergy: Enhancing Student Learning?

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Friday, September 25, 2009, 09:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Location: Past Workshop
Instructors: Dorothy Spiller
Research is critical to the endeavors of universities: how and whether research directly benefits the quality of students' learning experiences has much to do with context and approach. In this facilitated conversation, participants explored ways of integrating the research and teaching aspects of their role in ways that can directly enhance the quality of students' learning and engagement.

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

Oral vs Written Assessment of Student Learning: Exploring the Benefits of Assessing Learning by the Spoken Word

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Tuesday, November 03, 2009, 12:00 PM – 02:00 PM
Location: Erie G137A
Instructors: Gordon Joughin
The Centre for Teaching and Learning invites you to an informal brown-bag lunch session discussing a range of forms of oral assessment facilitated by the CTL's current Visiting Fellow, Dr. Gordon Joughin from the University of Wollongong. Assessment of student learning in universities is dominated by writing - essays, project reports, lab reports and written examinations are the staple fare of assessment in most disciplines. However, many disciplines and professors use oral forms of assessment, including presentations, moots, debates, short vivas to quiz students on their work, and simulated practice scenarios in social work, psychology, medicine and nursing. These forms of assessment can be particularly powerful experiences for students as well as highly authentic forms of assessing their learning achievements. This informal seminar will be an opportunity to share your experience of oral assessment with other interested faculty and to hear from our Visiting Scholar, Dr Gordon Joughin, who has published several articles on oral assessment, including 'Dimensions of oral assessment', 'Contrasting conceptions of oral presentations', and 'Oral assessment and postgraduate medical examinations: establishing conditions for validity, reliability and fairness'.

Monday, November 9, 2009

Designing Assessment to Support Student Learning

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Monday, November 09, 2009, 09:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Location: Erie G137A
Instructors: Gordon Joughin
In this workshop we will be considering the impact that the assessment of students’ learning has on how, what and when students learn and how the assessment of learning can be designed to support high quality learning in universities. Participants will be invited to apply a framework for learning-oriented assessment to their own courses and programs, to explore the impact of their assessments on their students’ learning, and to modify or re-design assessment tasks to meet both certification needs and the conditions for good learning. To do this, we will be looking at assessment from the learner’s perspective, using recent research into students’ experience of assessment and applying this to our own work as teachers and assessors. Workshop facilitator. Dr Gordon Joughin is a senior lecturer in the Academic Development Unit at the University of Wollongong, Australia and a Visiting Scholar in the Centre for Teaching and Learning at the University of Windsor. Gordon has written extensively on assessment and learning and is the editor of Assessment, Learning and Judgement in Higher Education (Springer, 2009).

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Linking Learning Outcomes and Assessment Practices

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Thursday, December 17, 2009, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: Erie G137A
Instructors: Gordon Joughin, Alan Wright

What can the University of Windsor academic community learn from the Australian experience of assessing student learning in higher education?

The Centre for Teaching and Learning’s Senior Visiting Fellow in Educational Development, Dr. Gordon Joughin (University of Wollongong, Australia), and Vice-Provost, Teaching and Learning, Dr. Alan Wright introduced participants to a recent Australian initiative to improve assessment practices across the disciplines, December 17.

Dr. Joughin and a group of assessment specialists and academic leaders have formulated seven key propositions for assessment reform in higher education, as part of an initiative called Assessment 2020. The presenters linked this initiative to the assessment of degree-level learning outcomes as they are being developed throughout the Ontario university network. Participants were invited to use these propositions and learning outcomes as tools for reviewing and renewing current assessment practices in their courses and programs.

While instructors at all levels and from all disciplines were encouraged to attend, this event was of particular interest to faculty responsible for program and curriculum development and review.

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Exploring Forms of Knowledge

Registration for this event is now closed.
This workshop gathers people from different disciplines to celebrate the many ways of knowing at play in the academy. It is designed to help teachers of any discipline appreciate the various forms of knowledge and ways of learning that exist in a class. This will enable you as a teacher to hone and target your teaching strategies. This workshop is designed to be engaging and interactive, with audience participation an important part of the learning process.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Exploring Forms of Knowledge

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Tuesday, April 27, 2010, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: Erie G137A
Instructors: Damian Ruth

Please Note: Due to popular demand, this workshop is a repeat of the one held Tuesday, 30th March.

This workshop gathers people from different disciplines to celebrate the many ways of knowing at play in the academy. It is designed to help teachers of any discipline appreciate the various forms of knowledge and ways of learning that exist in a class. This will enable you as a teacher to hone and target your teaching strategies. This workshop is designed to be engaging and interactive, with audience participation an important part of the learning process.

Friday, July 23, 2010

Invitational Education: What does this mean for university teachers?

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Friday, July 23, 2010, 09:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: Lambton 2103
Instructors: Patsy Paxton

Invitational Education is a theory of educational practice which maintains that every person and everything in and around schools, educational institutions and other organizations adds to, or subtracts from, the process of being a beneficial presence in the lives of human beings. Ideally, the factors of people, places, policies, programs and processes should be so intentionally inviting as to create a world in which each individual is cordially summoned to develop intellectually, socially, physically, psychologically, and spiritually.

A democratic society is ethically committed to seeing all people as able, valuable, and responsible, to valuing cooperation and collaboration, to viewing process as product in the making, and to developing untapped possibilities in all worthwhile areas of human endeavor.

Because the International Alliance for Invitational Education is dedicated to democratic principles, its mission is to enhance life-long learning, promote positive change in organizations, cultivate the personal and professional growth and satisfaction of educators and allied professionals, and enrich the lives of human beings personally and professionally.

Participants in this workshop will:

  • Be introduced to the basic concepts and underlying principles of Invitational Education
  • Be invited to reflect on their own experiences as students and also university teachers
  • Be invited to reflect on how Invitational Education, as a theory of educational practice, might be manifested in the classroom.

For more information on this theory, visit the invitational education website at http://www.invitationaleducation.net/

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Making group-work work: the challenge of requiring group-work for credit

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Wednesday, September 29, 2010, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
Location: McPherson Lounge
Instructors: Sue Purnell

Facilitating successful group work in teaching and learning settings can be challenging for both students and faculty. Students often do not see the value of group work, and the logistical challenges can discourage faculty from using group projects in their classes.

In this interactive workshop, we will explore a range of challenges that academic staff face when incorporating group work projects that are assessed into their courses. A number of questions relating to the effective use of group work will be explored, and participants will have the opportunity to discuss (and experience) a range of activities that could be used with their students.

Friday, October 29, 2010

The pitfalls of assessing group projects

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Friday, October 29, 2010, 09:30 AM – 11:30 AM
Location: McPherson Lounge
Instructors: Nick Baker, Sue Purnell
Assessing group work projects fairly, and with some validity is a potential minefield and students often complain about the lack of fairness in assigning grades in this mode. Despite these perceptions, there are a number of things that faculty can do to enhance the effectiveness, efficiency and learning experience of assessed group work. This workshop will encourage participants to consider a range of possible solutions to this dilemma, and enable them to evaluate their own practice in light of some new ideas.
NOTE: This workshop will take place in McPherson Lounge in Alumni Hall.

Friday, December 3, 2010

Evaluating the Learning Experience: A Strategy for Quality Enhancement

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Friday, December 03, 2010, 09:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Location: Lambton 2103
Instructors: Sue Purnell

When evaluation is used as a quality enhancement tool, it can encompass a wide range of strategies. Most people are familiar with student evaluation of teaching and this can be done in a range of different ways that you may not have considered. However, evaluation of the overall quality of a course or degree programme can be undertaken at a number of levels, which might include student focus groups, analysis of student assessment results, and/or feedback from employers or a professional body.

This session will use a basic model of evaluation to discuss a range of possible techniques, consider the timing of evaluations, and also processes that can be used to follow-up after an evaluation has taken place. Participants will be given the opportunity to critique any questionnaires that they are currently using, to see if they are actually providing useful information- so please bring along any (formal or informal) that you are currently using.

Thursday, December 9, 2010

Research-Stimulated Strategies for Self-Directed Learning

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Thursday, December 09, 2010, 09:00 AM – 10:30 AM
Location: Lambton 2103
Instructors: Sue Purnell, Alan Wright
Research-stimulated teaching proposes a framework of four different but related approaches to encouraging greater student engagement. In this interactive session the facilitators will provide the opportunity to consider the four approaches to research-stimulated teaching, challenging participants to reflect on how these approaches might be useful in their own practice at both the curriculum and classroom delivery levels, and emphasizing growth as a self-directed learner.

Thursday, January 20, 2011

“I hate group work!”: Online education strategy workshop for avoiding that phrase!

Registration for this event is now closed.
Schedule: Thursday, January 20, 2011, 09:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Location: Lambton 2103

Whether your course is face-to-face, blended or totally online, group work can be what contributes to retention and deep learning in your class, or sends people running in the opposite direction. This interactive workshop will discuss some effective strategies to develop a supportive culture and realistic expectations in your class about the role of group work in learning.

Topics included in this session are:

  • strategies to assign students to groups;
  • developing group norms and culture in the online setting;
  • setting realistic expectations for students and instructors; and
  • current tools available to support online group-work.
  • Friday, February 4, 2011

    Developing Online Educational Games: Platforms for Instructor Use

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, February 04, 2011, 12:00 PM – 02:00 PM
    Location: Trillium Room, Vanier Hall
    Instructors: Louise Sauvé

    A team of developers under Dr. Sauvé’s direction has developed “shells” for a variety of standard board games, to be used in multi- or single-user formats online. Using these tools, instructors can easily develop educational games adapted to the content of their own courses. The presentation will include a demonstration of these tools.

    Afin de faciliter l’utilisation des jeux éducatifs en ligne dans les écoles, une équipe du Centre d’expertise et de recherche sur l’apprentissage à vie (SAVIE), sous la responsabilité de la professeure et chercheuse Louise Sauvé, s’est attardée à développer et expérimenter des environnements d’apprentissage évolués de jeux afin d’outiller les enseignants pour qu’ils développent facilement des jeux éducatifs en ligne adaptés à leurs exigences pédagogiques.

    L’atelier s’adresse aux enseignants, aux chargés de cours, aux professionnels pédagogiques, aux professionnels de la médiatisation et aux responsables des services concernées par la qualité de l’enseignement. Après avoir défini la notion de jeux éducatifs en ligne, l’atelier permettra d’illustrer comment il est possible pour un enseignant de faire une production rapide de jeux en ligne à l’aide des coquilles génériques de jeux éducatifs du Carrefour Virtuel de Jeux Éducatifs – CVJE (http://carrefour-jeux.savie.ca). Enfin, quelques exemples de jeux éducatifs qui ont été développés à l’aide de ces outils de conception en ligne seront présentés.

    Friday, February 18, 2011

    S@mi-Perseverance: Enhancing Student Perseverance Online

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, February 18, 2011, 12:00 PM – 02:00 PM
    Location: Centennial Room, Vanier Hall
    Instructors: Louise Sauvé

    Based on the principles of personalized learning, the S@mi-Persévérance project integrates academic and social support for students, emphasizing access to skill development, autonomous learning, self-reflection, and self-evaluation. Driven by student input, the platform creates rapidly responsive personal learning pathways based on the user’s preferred learning modalities, preferred learning media and needs.

    S’appuyant sur des principes de personnalisation de l’apprentissage, S@MI-Persévérance propose un lieu d’autoapprentissage, d’autoréflexion et d’autoévaluation favorisant l’intégration académique et sociale des étudiants aux études universitaires (modèle de Tinto, 2005). De façon plus spécifique, le système permet aux étudiants, ayant ou non des troubles d’apprentissage, de diagnostiquer les difficultés éprouvées lors de leurs études et d’utiliser des outils d’aide et de soutien les plus adaptés à leurs besoins. Ce dispositif a été construit à l’aide d’une plateforme de conception de contenus en ligne synchrone et asynchrone, Personn@lisa, qui permet une adaptation rapide de sa structure, de ses composantes et l’organisation des outils d’aide à la persévérance.

    L’atelier s’adresse aux enseignants, aux chargés de cours, aux professionnels pédagogiques et aux responsables des Services à la vie étudiante et des Bureaux de réussite, qui sont à la recherche d’un dispositif d'aide à la persévérance aux études ou tout simplement d'outils d'aide à la persévérance aux études universitaires. Les objectifs poursuivis par l’atelier sont de présenter le contexte de développement de ce dispositif d’aide, de faire une démonstration du dispositif S@MI-Persévérance et d’échanger avec les participants sur les outils qu’ils utilisent dans leur contexte universitaire.

    Wednesday, February 23, 2011

    Synchronous and Asynchronous Learning Tools for Lifelong, Personalized Learning

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, February 23, 2011, 12:00 PM – 02:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Louise Sauvé

    Given the rapidly expanding array of web platforms, social networking and virtual community tools now available, universities must establish pedagogical and technological criteria to guide their priorities in creating engaging and effective personalized learning contexts for students, and these criteria must take into account the needs to two key user groups: students, and instructors. This presentation will assist those planning online learning initiatives to plan effectively and efficiently to optimize student learning.

    Devant la diversité des technologies Web (plateforme synchrone, asynchrone, mixte, Web 2.0, réseaux sociaux, communauté d’apprentissage) offertes pour soutenir la conception de contenus éducatifs en ligne, il est nécessaire que les universités puissent s’appuyer sur certains critères pédagogiques et technologiques qui les guideront dans leur choix technologique afin d’offrir un apprentissage personnalisé. Ces critères doivent prendre en compte à la fois les deux clientèles qui les utiliseront le plus : les étudiants et les enseignants.

    L’atelier s’adresse aux enseignants, aux chargés de cours, aux professionnels pédagogiques, aux professionnels de la médiatisation et aux responsables des services concernées par l’offre de formation en ligne. Les objectifs poursuivis par l’atelier sont de décrire les critères d’analyse pour personnaliser l’apprentissage en ligne tout au long de la vie, de présenter des outils d’aide à la conception d’environnement mixte d’apprentissage personnalisé et d’échanger avec les participants sur les outils qu’ils utilisent sur le Web pour soutenir leur enseignement.

    Wednesday, March 9, 2011

    'Boyer Reconsidered': Fostering Students’ Scholarly Habits of Mind and Models of Practice

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, March 09, 2011, 12:00 PM – 01:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Charles D. Morrison

    In his Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate, Ernest L. Boyer argued for a conception of ‘scholarship’ that recognizes traditional research – what he termed the ‘scholarship of discovery’ – but which also includes the scholarly domains of ‘integration’, ‘application’, and ‘teaching’. His validation of teaching has spawned a virtual ‘industry’ devoted to what is now known as the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

    In this paper, I focus on the overlap of scholarly activities associated with Boyer’s four domains, arguing that only teaching routinely and necessarily involves the other three domains.  I demonstrate how the array of intersecting scholarly habits of mind and models of practice generated from Boyer’s broader conception of scholarship resonates with teaching and learning contexts that have recently been dubbed ‘high impact educational practices’ to reflect their enhanced effectiveness in the learning process.   I conclude by demonstrating how the intersection of Boyer’s scholarly domains and high-impact educational practices, coupled with the profile of the ‘faculty scholar’ that emerges from Boyer’s work, offers up a necessary and timely model for the development of the ‘student as scholar’.  There is, as I perceive it, a serious need to balance the (quantitatively and qualitatively) great work on the faculty-teaching component of SoTL with an increased focus on the student-learning side.   In the end, I hope to map a trajectory from faculty scholar to student scholar, with Boyer’s scholarly habits of mind and models of practice intersecting with the opportunities and responsibilities offered to students through high-impact educational practices.

    Thursday, April 7, 2011

    Thinking With and Through Assessment and Evaluation

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, April 07, 2011, 01:00 PM – 02:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Jan Sobocan
    How do we know that our students are thinking at a higher level? How can involving students in the development of criteria for judgment develop higher order thinking? And how can transparency in teaching, testing, and student self-evaluation together help ensure that the desired thinking skills are learned? Using mastery teaching principles and research-based critical thinking evaluation practices workshop participants will create thinking skill(s) questions. Small inter-disciplinary groups will work together in evaluating the validity of those questions in order to highlight some key problems with creating questions that aim to test thinking skills. The outcome of the workshop is to illustrate a general approach to evaluation that helps build instructor confidence in assessments of thinking. The exercises are also aimed at illustrating how both group and individual student participation in the evaluation process helps students build and independently practice critical thinking skills prior to a high stakes culminating assignment or exam. Participants are encouraged to bring in test items or essay questions from their respective disciplines that are used to test higher level thinking skills.

    Friday, April 29, 2011

    9:30 AM

    Developing Facilitation Skills

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, April 29, 2011, 09:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: David Kaufman

    Facilitating small group discussions can be a challenging task for any instructor, however we know that small group discussion improves learning in our students so we persist. This workshop aims to increase participants’ basic skills in small group discussion facilitation, and to help you develop options for dealing with more difficult situations in groups. We will look at the rationale for using small group teaching, characteristics of effective and dysfunctional groups, and some core facilitation skills that will help you. The workshop will also address questioning strategies in facilitation, managing challenging situations in small groups, and some of the key principles guiding small-group facilitation.

    Please note: Due to high demand, this workshop has moved from Room LT2103 and will now be held in Room G141, Lambton Tower Basement.

    1:30 PM

    New Technologies for Teaching and Learning

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, April 29, 2011, 01:30 PM – 04:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: David Kaufman

    There are a plethora of new technologies available to us and our students. For some of us, using this technology is second nature, while for others it is more of a challenge. An additional challenge is how to select and use appropriate new technologies in our teaching. This workshop aims to introduce you to a wide variety of new technologies and to discuss their use in teaching and learning. We will explore topics such as blogs and wikis, podcasting, online communication tools, ePortfolios, mobile devices, games and simulations, online labs, video-enhanced learning, and social networking tools. By the end of the workshop, you will be able to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using a range of technologies in teaching and learning, and apply that to your own teaching context.

    Please note: Due to high demand, this workshop has moved from Room LT2103 and will now be held in Room G141, Lambton Tower Basement.

    Tuesday, May 3, 2011

    Using Humour in Teaching

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, May 03, 2011, 09:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: David Kaufman

    Teaching is a highly personal endeavour in which we share something of ourselves with our audience. Humour can be a very effective tool to enhance student engagement and improve their experience in our classes. This workshop will introduce participants to the potential benefits and challenges of incorporating humour into their teaching, and to provide a number of techniques for using humour effectively in teaching. We will look at the definition and benefits of humour; using cartoons in teaching; telling stories and jokes; use of role plays, theatre and videos; appropriate and inappropriate use of video; and where and how to find resources.

    Please note: Due to high demand, this workshop has moved from Room LT2103 and will now be held in Room G141, Lambton Tower Basement.

    Monday, June 13, 2011

    Voice, Body and Presence

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, June 13, 2011, 09:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Location: Erie Basement Studio B
    Instructors: Anne Scrimger

    Have you ever thought about how your vocal tone, your facial expression or the way you move in the classroom can shape the learning climate? In this participatory workshop you will explore elements of your vocal, verbal and non verbal delivery. Please come ready to discuss assumptions, try vocal exercises and play with your sense of space and physical environment.

    Friday, June 24, 2011

    Test Item Writing Workshop

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, June 24, 2011, 09:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Cynthia Onyefulu
    This workshop is designed for participants who are interested in writing better test items. The workshop will introduce participants to the skills of writing measurable objectives for item construction, and creating good multiple-choice and essay questions and scoring key. To maximize the benefits of this workshop, participants are advised to bring past test papers they would like to improve upon.

    Wednesday, June 29, 2011

    Improving Reliability and Validity through the Use of Item Analysis

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, June 29, 2011, 09:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Cynthia Onyefulu
    This workshop is designed for participants who are interested in improving the difficulty level of their test items, the reliability and validity of individual test items, and the test paper as a whole. The workshop will introduce participants to the calculations and interpretations of item analysis for multiple choice items, and the estimation of inter-rater reliability for the essay questions.

    Monday, September 12, 2011

    Less is More: Creating Accessible MS Word and PowerPoint Documents

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, September 12, 2011, 01:00 PM – 03:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Anne Dickinson

    Would you like some tips on how to make your Word documents and PowerPoint slides more accessible for your students? In the UK, it is the law to produce accessible lecture notes for students, and to anticipate that there might be a disabled student in the group.

    This session is divided into two sections: demonstration and workshop. At the end of the demonstration, you will be aware of accessibility and of basic tasks that you can do to make your documents and presentations more accessible. You can use the workshop time to put this into practice by adapting your own materials. If you wish to make best use of the workshop, please bring a Word document or a PowerPoint presentation with you.

    Friday, September 16, 2011

    11:00 AM

    Constructions of “Success” in Academia: Findings from an International Research Project

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, September 16, 2011, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Kathryn Sutherland

    Success in academia is traditionally associated with research productivity, external grant revenue, and disciplinary reputation – at least according to the handbooks for new academics and the story told by promotions documents. However, early career faculty tell a parallel story that is more values-driven, where academic success is also about self-fulfilment, enjoyment, autonomy and security. Early career faculty are pulled in many directions by the performative demands of promotion and tenure processes, the realities of competitive funding, and their own personal career and life aspirations.  Where might restricted external constructions of success leave the early career faculty who wish to identify as more or other than researchers? And how can early career faculty balance their own aspirations and personal constructions of success with the demands of their institutions, disciplines, and students? This seminar presents the findings of a research project on early career faculty experiences, conducted with nearly more than 60 ECAs internationally, and argues for a need to allow space for multiple constructions of “success” in academia.

    1:30 PM

    Avoiding PowerPoint Karaoke

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, September 16, 2011, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: The Oak Room, Vanier Hall
    Instructors: Kathryn Sutherland

    Microsoft PowerPoint is a popular and powerful tool for communicating with students. During this session, participants will learn how to design slides that assist learning, use PowerPoint during lectures, and effectively use handouts. While this session focuses on using PowerPoint, the material is applicable to a wide variety of presentation technologies and learning contexts.

    Tuesday, October 18, 2011

    Use What You Have: Your Voice and Body in the Classroom

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: The Katzman Lounge
    Instructors: Michael Keating

    Join School of Dramatic Art professor Michael Keating for a talk about how to use your vocal powers and physical presence to communicate more compellingly in the classroom. This interactive workshop will include a series of activities, and time for questions and discussion.
    Please note: The location for this workshop has changed to the Katzman Lounge, Vanier Hall

    Wednesday, November 16, 2011

    We Learn by Doing: Learning Through Simulation

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, November 16, 2011, 09:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Cherry Stewart

    Neuroscience research suggests that long-lasting learning is best accomplished when the learning activity is connected directly to physical experience. Students remember best when facts and skills are embedded in real-life activity – in experiential learning. In this workshop, participants will learn how to make classroom activity more immersive by using experiential learning activities like simulation exercises.

    The workshop will include a discussion of educational applications from neuroscience research; a discussion of the key content elements of simulation activities and how they relate to learning; a discussion of the various evaluation frameworks for learning via simulation activities; engagement with simulation software; and a discussion regarding implementation strategies in online or classroom environment.

    Wednesday, November 23, 2011

    Copyright Fundamentals in the Classroom and Beyond

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Joan Dalton , Gwendolyn Ebbett

    Copyright has become a topical issue in recent years as new technologies change the way we share, create and interact with information and with one another. Questions and confusion around copyright abound.

    Let us help you through the quagmire by reviewing recent developments in the copyright landscape in Canada and by revisiting some legal fundamentals and offering assistance in how to make the best use of the vast amount of available print and digital content for teaching and learning.

    Friday, December 2, 2011

    Blended Design for Reflective eLearning

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, December 02, 2011, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    and Friday, December 16, 2011, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    (list dates)
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Cherry Stewart

    Introduction Session: Friday, December 2, 1:30-3:30pm, Lambton 2103
    Closing Session: Friday December 16, 2011, 1:30-3:30pm, Lambton 2103
    Dates: Face-to-face sessions will take place on December 2 and December 16, from 1:30-3:30pm in Lambton 2103. The rest of the sessions will be online in CLEW.
    Commitment: Approximately 1 hour per day.

    Neuroscience research suggests that long-lasting learning is best accomplished when the learning activity is connected directly to physical experience. Online learning is often thought to be a passive medium for learning. Today’s students have multiple demands on their time. Many find it more helpful to their lifestyle to be able to study while continuing their normal daily activities. Digital tools are available to ensure that learning is not a passive activity. Curricula design for online learning may incorporate many strategies. In this program you will choose one of four strategies. You will then engage with daily activities to support your learning. A final evaluation workshop will close the process.

    This program highlights the connections between neuroscience and education. You will be engaged in discovery, experimentation, feedback, and reflective action while considering the various strategies and tactics that might be utilised in a constructed online learning environment. Your commitment to this program requires an average of approximately one hour per day. The time you spend online will vary with activity. An introductory face-to-face meeting will be held to kick off the program as well a final wrap-up session.

    Friday, December 9, 2011

    Educational Design and Networked Learning: Can You See a Pattern Here?

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, December 09, 2011, 09:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Cherry Stewart

    Instructors design courses and assignments by determining a learning goal and constructing activities to support students in the process of mindful learning. Brain research and research on the effect of experiential-based learning activities on student learning suggest the importance of linking values and patterns with the technicalities of course design.

    In this interactive workshop, participants will be encouraged to think in terms of learning patterns when planning learning activities. The workshop will include a discussion of concepts from brain research and their application to curriculum design; an investigation of some of the development programs around pattern templates; creation of a learning pattern using randomly generated activity words; and a discussion regarding implementation strategies for online or classroom environments. Participants are invited to bring a lesson plan or assignment to work on during the workshop.

    Friday, January 6, 2012

    Get Your Face Out of Those Lecture Notes: How to Talk To Large Classes

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, January 06, 2012, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: The Katzman Lounge
    Instructors: Lionel Walsh
    This workshop will identify ways in which your lectures can capture the attention and interest of your students by transforming your delivery style. You will learn strategies for effective communication with large groups, utilize Power Point notes effectively, and how to build a relationship with your class.

    Tuesday, January 31, 2012

    Understanding Our Students: Similarities and Differences Between Cultures

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, January 31, 2012, 02:00 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Jane Clarke
    How does culture affect student learning? In this workshop, participants will interrogate a small number of case studies, and discuss whether cultural background had a particular effect on student approaches to learning.

    Thursday, February 9, 2012

    Peer Review of Teaching: Maximizing Gains, Minimizing Risks

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, February 09, 2012, 02:30 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: The Oak Room, Vanier Hall
    Instructors: Nancy Van Note Chism

    The very mention of peer review of teaching summons the image of a quick but unnerving visit to one’s classroom, later summarized in a cursory evaluative note written by a reluctant colleague. Small wonder that this approach isn’t the universal companion to student evaluation of teaching!

    In this session, we’ll explore the two main functions of peer review of teaching—improvement and evaluation. We will examine the main advantages of and objections to peer review of teaching and the major components of a good system. Finally, we’ll generate ideas for how a peer review of teaching system might be constructed in a way that is suited to the context of Windsor University.

    Tuesday, February 14, 2012

    What Underpins Outstanding Teaching and Enables Exceptional Learning? Staff and Student Perceptions

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, February 14, 2012, 01:30 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: The Katzman Lounge
    Instructors: Jane Clarke
    During this session, Professor Clarke will describe the findings from a four-stage study that she and four colleagues from De Montfort University conducted on what constitutes outstanding teaching and enables exceptional student learning. The workshop will include video-clips of lecturers commenting on teacher responsiveness, assessment, curriculum, and classroom technology. Participants will also discuss the extent to which this research has any resonance with perceptions of outstanding teaching at UWindsor.

    Friday, March 16, 2012

    Communicating Effectively and Assessing Understanding: a Workshop for Graduate Supervisors and Mentors

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, March 16, 2012, 10:00 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: Freed Orman Centre, Assumption University
    Instructors: Tracy C. Davis

    Good communication is a key element of any relationship and research mentoring is no exception. But how can mentors adjust their approach in order to become more effective? And what can we do when an impasse or outright conflict arises? This workshop focuses on assessing obstacles to students’ success in tandem with what mitigates against our effectiveness as mentors by:

    • recognizing our communication style and the challenges this presents when working with mentees who have contrasting approaches;
    • identifying and practicing concrete strategies for addressing troubling symptoms and engaging in difficult conversations with mentees; and
    • improving understanding of how difference and cultural awareness impact workplace conduct and students’ ability to conduct research.

    This workshop is presented by the Humanities Research Group (HRG), co-hosted by the School of Graduate Studies and CTL.

    Thursday, April 12, 2012

    Developing Groups that Work: Inclusivity

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, April 12, 2012, 10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Kaye Johnson

    A class project...group work...sounds simple enough. For some, the very thought of group work raises feelings of dread and trepidation. Others thrive in group work settings, and embrace such opportunities. Why the wide gap? Who benefits from group work and who is disadvantaged?

    In this workshop, we will consider the impact of cultural differences; personality differences (introverts/extroverts); sexism, racism, and "knowing one's place"; classism in the classroom; "hidden" disabilities; apparent disabilities and the attitudinally challenged; who has a sense of belonging and why, and who doesn't.

    We will explore some subtle and less subtle ways in which power dynamics and imbalances within the group reflect/perpetuate those in the wider society...and more importantly, when we know, what do we do?

    Tuesday, May 8, 2012

    Peer Observation and Professional Practice in the UK

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, May 08, 2012, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Carole L. Davis
    Carole L. Davis will describe how a teaching observation project was found to influence professional practice at Middlesex University in the United Kingdom. The teaching observation experience provided the catalyst for both Professor Davis, as the practitioner researcher, and the study participants to enter into a dialogue about the role of peer feedback and support within the context of the professional development of lecturers in higher education. The project was focused on the identification of the most effective way of carrying out teaching observations, an analysis of the shared experiences of teachers and the overall impact, the outcomes of observations when they were a part of a series, and what observations tell us about subject specific pedagogies.

    Wednesday, September 19, 2012

    Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Katrina Falkner

    Educational psychologists suggest that learning is best done within a social, collaborative environment, where students are able to leverage increased engagement and deeper learning resulting from working within a group. In this workshop, participants will explore several examples of how to include collaborative and social constructivist activities within their courses.

    The workshop will include a discussion of the theoretical basis underpinning these techniques; a discussion of specific techniques, including collaborative learning, co-operative learning and contributing student pedagogy; and several implementation strategies for online and face-to-face environments.

    Thursday, September 27, 2012

    Models for Online and Open Learning: Developing Innovative and Creative Programs for 21st Century Learning at the University of Windsor

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, September 27, 2012, 09:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: Laurier Hall - 204 (International Student Centre)
    Instructors: Christine Smith

    Dr. Christine Smith, the University of Windsor’s newly appointed Director of Open Learning, will facilitate an interactive workshop to introduce University staff, instructors, and students to the ways in which the Office for Open Learning Services (TOOLS) can support developments and ambitions for open learning.

    During this session, participants will explore a range of potential pedagogical models for open and online learning as well as a pedagogical framework for course design, and will consider existing models, particularly in the UK, and identify the challenge each model presents.  Participants are encouraged to bring along their ideas and ambitions for new online programs and courses, as well as their perceived needs for support in these activities.

    Tuesday, October 23, 2012

    The Write Approach: Teaching Your Students How to Write Better Essays

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, October 23, 2012, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G137A
    Instructors: Cath Fraser

    Whose job is it to introduce students to the craft of academic writing? We often assume our students will arrive with this skill – or at least, pick it up as they go. Or, we might decide that the task rests with out-of-class support services. Regardless, including a single session in which a focus on writing is combined with content delivery offers huge dividends: it allows instructors to set high expectations, introduce students to the particular writing style of the discipline, and demystify one of the most fundamental but solitary practices in higher education.

    This interactive workshop will demonstrate one strategy for improving student essay writing. The facilitator will provide you with examples of effective resources, and will discuss ways in which this approach can be tailored to suit individual contexts.

    Tuesday, November 6, 2012

    Sharing the Load: Interdisciplinary Collaborations for Research, Writing, and Student Engagement Opportunities

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, November 06, 2012, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G137A
    Instructors: Cath Fraser

    Are you looking for ways to strengthen student engagement, or improve success and retention? Perhaps you are interested in a new teaching practice, assessment, or pedagogy? Are you seeking a new research project, or have already identified an area of interest, but need a team to get there?

    Collaborating with colleagues across campus with different experience and expertise can help both parties to develop synergies and maximize outcomes. And usefully, developing inter-faculty relationships through special project collaborations offers great opportunities for publishing accounts of the initiative which can contribute to the literature in your field.

    This interactive workshop will consider some strategies for brokering professional partnerships, as well as managing the demands of collaborative research and writing. Workshop facilitator, Cath Fraser, will offer some examples of successful collaborations in which she has been involved, and facilitate a discussion about how similar projects could be developed amongst participants.

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

    Presentation Alternatives: How to Avoid “Death by PowerPoint”

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, January 24, 2013, 01:00 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Pierre Boulos, Peter Marval

    Whether for your classes or for research and/or conference presentations, visual presentations are nearly unavoidable. For years, Microsoft PowerPoint has been the standard bearer of slide presentation applications, but several alternatives have emerged. The alternatives offer different functionalities and may even help avoid "death by PowerPoint."

    In this session, we will explore alternatives to standard presentation tools, including when and when not to use them.

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

    Use What You Have: Your Voice and Body in the Large Classroom

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, January 29, 2013, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Michael Keating

    Join School of Dramatic Art professor Michael Keating for a talk about how to use your vocal powers and physical presence to communicate more compellingly in the large classroom.

    This interactive workshop will include a series of activities, and time for questions and discussion.

    Friday, March 22, 2013

    Tools and Techniques for Effective Mentoring

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, March 22, 2013, 09:00 AM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Tracy C. Davis

    Good communication is a key element of any relationship and research mentoring is no exception. How can mentors adjust their approach in order to become more effective?

    In this intensive, two-part workshop, Tracy C. Davis (Northwestern University) will lead participants through a series of engaging and interactive exercises that focus on:

    • the skills that faculty need to help students progress toward autonomy;
    • and tools and strategies to help faculty and students become dynamic partners in graduate students’ intellectual and professional development.

    By stipulating our expectations as mentors and supervisors, and communicating clearly and effectively, we can help students progress toward independent research. Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

    Tracy C. Davis is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in The Graduate School and Barber Professor of Performing Arts at Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois). She has directed the Excellence in Doctoral Mentoring Initiative since its inception. Her focus in The Graduate School is on supporting interdisciplinary programming, leading processes to enhance graduate programs’ recruitment and visibility, and issues related to curriculum development and revision.

    This workshop is sponsored by the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the Humanities Research Group, the Office of Research Services, and the Centre for Teaching and Learning.

    Wednesday, April 3, 2013

    Designing Effective Academic Posters

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, April 03, 2013, 01:30 PM – 03:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Peter Marval

    During this workshop, participants will discover fundamental graphic design principles as well as helpful hints on how to create eye-catching and informative academic posters. Participants will also review alternatives to commonly used poster design software, like PowerPoint.

    Tuesday, April 16, 2013

    Designing Effective Academic Posters

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, April 16, 2013, 01:30 PM – 03:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Peter Marval

    During the first part of this workshop, participants will discover fundamental graphic design principles as well as helpful hints on how to create eye-catching and informative academic posters. Participants will also review alternatives to commonly used poster design software, like PowerPoint.

    Participants are encouraged to bring poster ideas or posters they've started so they can work on them during the second part of this workshop. Laptops will be available to work on, or participants can bring their own.

    Thursday, April 18, 2013

    How to SoTL: Researching and Writing About Teaching and Learning

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, April 18, 2013, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Jessica Raffoul
    The scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) asks instructors to examine their own classroom practice, along with scholarship and research, and share their findings with the aim of improving student learning and enhancing teaching quality. We invite you to join us for an interactive, engaging session on what, why, and how to SoTL. The session will include hands-on activities aimed at helping you become more comfortable with the scholarship of teaching and learning, how to get started, the different forms SoTL can take, and SoTL publication and presentation outlets. The workshop facilitator will also provide practical tips on researching, writing, and publishing SoTL work in peer-reviewed journals, pulling from her experience as the managing editor of the Society for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE) publication, Collected Essays on Learning and Teaching.

    Friday, May 31, 2013

    Reflecting on our Practice: How to Develop Personal Philosophies of Teaching

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, May 31, 2013, 09:30 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Kola Babarinde

    Why do you teach? What inspires students to learn in your subject area? How do you facilitate their learning with your worldview? These and similar questions are at the heart of a teaching philosophy statement.

    Senior Visiting Fellow in Educational Development, Dr. Kola Babarinde (University of Ibadan, Nigeria), will lead an interactive workshop on how to develop personal philosophies of teaching.

    During this session, participants will learn about the different (and traditional) components of a teaching philosophy statement, building a comprehensive table of reference that will include different schools of philosophy. Participants will begin to build their own personal philosophies of teaching.

    Participants are encouraged to bring their iPads, Laptops, and other similar wireless devices for literature reviews and other activities.

    Friday, July 12, 2013

    Threshold Concepts

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, July 12, 2013, 01:30 PM – 04:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Joanne Maddern
    “…In certain disciplines there are ‘conceptual gateways’ or ‘portals’ that lead to a previously inaccessible, and initially perhaps ‘troublesome’ way of thinking about something” write Meyer and Land. (2005, p. 373). In this session we will unpick and discuss the controversial notion of threshold concepts. Do they exist in your discipline? What are they? Accepting that threshold concepts are a useful framework for thinking about ‘portals’ or key ideas in our subjects, we will then examine the implications for curriculum design during this interactive session.

    Tuesday, July 30, 2013

    Reflective Practice

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, July 30, 2013, 01:30 PM – 04:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Joanne Maddern
    Being a reflective practitioner sounds simple - but is it? This session examines the role that reflective practice can play in enhancing your teaching and academic practice. We will carry out a number of practical activities designed to improve your own reflective practice - such as a critical incident analysis. We will look at how we can reflect in a more structured way to improve our own performance. We will also finish by looking at some critiques of reflective practice and what you might do differently as a result of the session.

    Tuesday, August 6, 2013

    Action Research

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, August 06, 2013, 01:30 PM – 04:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Joanne Maddern
    This session will trace the history and emergence of action research and its popularity within educational development. We will examine how it is used in a structured way to interrogate your own teaching practice and become a researcher in your own lecture hall. We will examine some action research projects carried out in Aberystwyth University as part of the Postgraduate Certificate in Teaching in Higher Education. This will be both a theoretical and practical session where there is an opportunity to share and exchange good practice.

    Wednesday, November 27, 2013

    100%: Best Practices in Grading

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, November 27, 2013, 01:00 PM – 03:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: David Andrews, Judy Bornais, Dora Cavallo-Medved, Anne Forrest, Renée Wintermute, Alan Wright
    The recently implemented grade conversion policy and upcoming deadlines for final assignments and exams make this a perfect time to get together to share our best practices in grading. Facilitated by Vice-Provost Alan Wright, this interactive workshop will feature a panel of instructors who will share their models and ideas for assigning numeric grades to a range of assignments, addressing (and forestalling!) student concerns and complaints about their grades, and ensuring students are clear on your expectations. Bring your questions and ideas to join the discussion.

    Friday, January 31, 2014

    Data Driven: Effective Strategies to Assess Your Teaching

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, January 31, 2014, 09:30 AM – 12:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Phil Graniero, Bev Hamilton, Allyson Skene
    If you've been looking for ways to uncover what's happening in your courses, this workshop is a good place to start. We'll explore common course and program level data -- data you already have access to -- and help you to develop questions about your teaching and student learning, and show you simple strategies which can help answer those questions. On the way we'll work through case examples to illustrate how data confirm (or refute!) instructors' hunches. Strategies discussed will help you to both document your successes for your teaching portfolio as well as gather valuable formative feedback for future improvement. Please bring your own laptop loaded with Excel if possible. If not, one will be provided.

    Tuesday, February 18, 2014

    Blended Learning Design Institute: Day 1

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, February 18, 2014, 09:00 AM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    BLDI Day 1: Principles, Pedagogy and Planning in Blended Learning Day 1 of the program focuses on the foundational theoretical underpinnings of blended learning course design, within a practical framework. This series of workshop-style activities will introduce you to concepts such as active learning, student engagement, deep learning and Universal Design for Instruction in blended learning. Mapping and aligning the course, designing and converting courses, best practices in high quality blended classrooms, flipping your classes, authentic assessment, and quality enhancement processes will all be addressed. Participants will use common course design models to begin to plan blended learning approaches in their own courses. Please bring a laptop or tablet if you have one. If you do not have access to one, please email Alicia Higgison at higgison@uwindsor.ca so that enough extra technology can be provided if possible.

    Wednesday, February 19, 2014

    Blended Learning Design Institute: Day 2

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, February 19, 2014, 09:00 AM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    BLDI Day 2: Practical Pedagogy: Blended Learning Tools Day 2 focuses on active learning and student engagement using some of the new tools available to instructors at the University of Windsor. It will provide an introduction to Echo360 lecture capturing options, and the Lecture Tools Student Engagement Platform. The sessions will be interactive and hands on. Please bring a laptop or tablet if you have one. If you don't have access to one, please email Alicia Higgison at higgison@uwindsor.ca and we will attempt to provide additional equipment

    Thursday, February 20, 2014

    Blended Learning Design Institute: Day 3

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, February 20, 2014, 10:00 AM – 03:00 PM
    Location: Your Office
    BLDI Day 3: Consultation Day: Solidifying Plans Mentors and consultants from the first two days of the program will be available for one on one or small group consultations to help you solidify your blended learning course development plan. This day will be the start of the development process, helping you set goals and plan for what support you will need to achieve the goals you set.

    Tuesday, February 25, 2014

    Frameworks for Progressing Your Teaching through Evidence, Reflection, and Narrative

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, February 25, 2014, 01:30 PM – 03:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Gordon Joughin
    In this workshop we will be considering some frameworks of good teaching that will help you to identify what is best in your own teaching, how to describe your teaching in student-centred ways, and the kinds of evidence that you have, or could gather, that will support your claims as a teacher. The frameworks can also help you to identify aspects of your teaching that you might want to develop further. The workshop should help advance your thinking about and documentation of your own teaching (for example, in a teaching portfolio or award submission) in ways that will be most persuasive to yourself and to others, as well as help you to chart directions for progress in the future. The workshop will be based on the facilitator’s experience of working with numerous award winning teachers in Australia as well as on the experience and ideas of the workshop participants.

    Thursday, February 27, 2014

    Echo 360 and Lecture Tools Consultation

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, February 27, 2014, 01:30 PM – 02:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2102
    Instructors: Lorna Stolarchuk
    Discussed uses of Lecture Tools, Echo360 system, and Personal Capture tools.

    Monday, March 31, 2014

    Teaching 2.0: Introducing New Tools to Support Blended Teaching and Learning

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, March 31, 2014, 01:30 PM – 04:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141

    Blended, hybrid and ‘flipped’ teaching and learning is becoming increasingly more common in higher education, as universities adapt to the changing needs of learners and society, and as we learn more about the most effective teaching practices. Purposeful blending of technology in traditional teaching has the potential to create powerful learning environments that improve student engagement, deepen learning, and achieve learning outcomes.

    The University of Windsor was recently successful in seeking funding from the Ministry for Training, Colleges and Universities for implementation of new technology to support blended learning approaches. The funding supports the installation of the Echo360 integrated student engagement platform, which includes a powerful suite of tools for classroom lecture capturing, personal lecture capturing (capturing lessons wherever the instructor is), live streaming of classes to remote participants, and the Lecture Tools platform that allows for quizzes and ‘clicker’ style questions to be integrated into classes. The tools also come with powerful learning analytics that can help you understand how your students are learning and indicate where students are struggling.

    This interactive workshop will introduce instructors to the possibilities these new tools provide for developing interactive and engaging learning environments in on campus, blended and distance courses. You will have the opportunity to explore the power of these new tools and discover ways to effectively employ them in your classes.

    Friday, May 23, 2014

    Responding To Student Evaluations of Teaching

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, May 23, 2014, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Eileen Herteis

    Faced with anonymous end-of-course student feedback, professors often tend to react personally before they respond instructionally.

    Through the use of a short case study, this session is designed to put student evaluations into perspective and context and to explore constructive strategies for connecting student feedback with continuous teaching enhancement.

    Monday, June 9, 2014

    The Teaching Philosophy Statement: No need to be coy, Roy!

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, June 09, 2014, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Eileen Herteis

    There is no single ideal teaching Philosophy Statement; each one is as unique as the teacher who writes it. The Philosophy Statement is at the very heart of every teacher’s dossier, offering the context for your teaching practices and decisions. First and foremost, your Philosophy Statement should be personal and genuine. It should clearly articulate and then animate the conceptual framework that underpins your teaching values, principles, and goals.

    This session is designed to provide guidelines for several approaches to creating your Statement. Each approach will focus on setting coyness aside to select the best, most persuasive foundation to showcase your teaching achievements and to provide reflective contexts for them.

    Friday, September 19, 2014

    Effective Communication across Languages and Cultures

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, September 19, 2014, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Emma Bourassa
    Effective communication does not look the same from culture to culture. As teachers working with students of different cultural backgrounds, it is useful to be able to identify different communication styles in order to increase student success. Participants will engage in experiential learning to challenge some of the underlying assumptions that can interrupt communication and learning in a multicultural/multilingual classroom and practice strategies that they can use right away.

    Tuesday, October 21, 2014

    Professional Conversations: A Necessary Tool for Change

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, October 21, 2014, 01:30 PM – 03:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Kerri Burchill

    Most faculty in higher education institutions are expected to publish and teach – responsibilities that are traditionally carried out in isolation. However, this tradition of isolation creates challenge, as it lacks a structure to facilitate professional dialogue and so limits faculty’s opportunity to benefit from the insights and talents of other faculty members (Hargreaves & Fullan, 2013; Eib & Miller, 2006).

    Today, many institutions are creating more opportunities for faculty to dialogue about teaching and learning. This workshop explores effective strategies to put an end to “pedagogical solitude” (Shulman 1993), and shift institutional and individual thinking away from what Senge et al. (2004) refer to as “reactive learning” into “deeper levels of understanding” (p. 10-11). Participants will explore a professional conversation framework, and have the opportunity to discuss how this framework could be applied to their own context.

    References

    Hargreaves, A., & Fullan, M. (2013). The power of professional capital. Journal of Staff Development , 34 (3).

    Senge, P., Scharmer, C. O., Jaworski, J., & Flowers, B. (2004). Presence an Exploration of Profound Change in People, Orgnaizations, and Society. New York: Doubleday.

    Shulman, L. (1993). Teaching as communty property. Change , 25 (6).

    Tuesday, March 17, 2015

    Engaging Students with Technology

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, March 17, 2015, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Tanya Noel, Allyson Skene, Lorna Stolarchuk, ShiKui Wu

    Active engagement of students promotes critical thinking and a deeper approach to learning. It can, however, also be challenging to implement, particularly in large classes. Join us in this interactive workshop to explore different ways that faculty have made the most of technology newly available at the University of Windsor to efficiently and effectively encourage students to engage in courses from a variety of disciplines.

    Thursday, April 16, 2015

    Identifying and Navigating Entry Points in the Body (of SoTL)

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, April 16, 2015, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: David Andrews, Michael K. Potter, Jessica Raffoul

    Belonging to no discipline yet informing and affecting pedagogical practice in all, the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) can be intimidating. Complicating matters further, SoTL has its own conventions, assumptions, models, and literature that may strike disciplinary scholars as foreign.

    In this interactive session, participants will learn new ways to identify entry points into SoTL by making connections to research experiences in their home disciplines, and using metaphors drawn from the human body. As in the body, all parts of the research system are interdependent. Without the strength provided by its ligaments and muscles, for example, the vertebrae of the spine would buckle under relatively low loads. Research features similar relationships, logical connections that are crucial to proper functioning. By identifying and exploring these relationships in their disciplinary research, participants will learn how they can be used to enter the world of SoTL.

    This session will provide a forum for instructors from all disciplines to:

    • identify entry points into the scholarship of teaching and learning;
    • use their own disciplinary traditions, discourses, and research methods to initiate a SoTL project; and
    • exchange insights, methods, and findings with others from different disciplinary cultures.

    Thursday, April 23, 2015

    Conducting research using our children, ahem, I mean our students, as participants

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Thursday, April 23, 2015, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Pierre Boulos

    SoTL investigates the effects of teaching and learning practices, with the aim of refining higher education over time. Much SoTL involves the use of students as research participants. In fact, some argue that SoTL has made insufficient use of students, for it relies too much on teachers' perceptions and other proxies that cannot be linked reliably to student learning. Certainly, many argue, if student learning is the phenomenon we are most interested in investigating, we must study the students themselves.

    Yet, a variety of ethical issues arise when students participate in SoTL research. Some of these are handled by local Research Ethics Boards (REB), some are not. In every study, researchers must bring an array of values, principles, reasoning, and duties to bear on the ethical issues involved -- if they notice or anticipate them. When issues go unnoticed, of course, the ethical resources one may use to deal with them are irrelevant.

    Can we make justifiable and useful claims in SoTL without using our students as research participants? If so, given the ethical issues involved in such use -- including potential harm/benefit, justice, and human dignity -- do we have a responsibility or obligation to conduct only SoTL research that does not use students as research participants? Furthermore, do the same considerations imply an obligation to conduct only research that is likely to benefit students?

    The session will use a case-study to challenge participants to think through the beliefs and values underlying their practices as SoTL researchers, tease out complications and implications, and dig through surface issues to the deeper problems beneath. The conclusions reached through this dialogue cannot be known in advance, though the value of the journey, wherever it may end, could be substantial. That said, we anticipate that by the end of this session attendees will be able to:

    • Apply principles of research ethics to their work as SoTL researchers;
    • Surface and discuss ethical issues and implications of SoTL research practices;
    • Articulate their underlying beliefs and values as researchers.

    Monday, May 11, 2015

    Assuring the Quality and Alignment of Learning Outcomes and Assessment in Higher Education

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, May 11, 2015, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Geoff Scott

    This workshop for local and central leaders of Learning and Teaching at the University will parallel those now completed or underway with learning leaders of assessment in Europe, the UK, New Zealand, Australia, the USA, Malaysia and the University of the South Pacific, as part of his role as National Senior Teaching Fellow with Australia’s Office for Learning and Teaching.

    It will explore whether assessment practices at the University of Windsor confirm that we are producing graduates who are not only work ready for today but work ready plus for tomorrow, contributing to a comparison of Canadian practices with those elsewhere. A short, one page outline, of Professor Scott’s work is attached.

    Participants are asked to bring along with them one example of an assessment task which they have found to attract high levels of positive student feedback and which taps into the sorts of capabilities needed for students to successfully perform effectively in the rapidly changing context of the 21st Century.

    Monday, September 28, 2015

    Evidencing Quality: Teaching Criteria and Standards

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, September 28, 2015, 01:00 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Denise Chalmers

    Demonstrating quality of teaching is a significant challenge, but a growing imperative for personal, professional, and institutional reasons. This workshop will explore the applicability of the Australian University Teaching Criteria and Standards (AUTCAS) framework to the Canadian context, and in particular to University of Windsor faculty.

    Developed through an extensive review of the literature and current practices in international and Australian universities, as well as wide consultation across the higher education sector, the AUTCAS framework is underpinned by carefully researched definitions and principles of quality teaching that are expressed through seven criteria. For each criterion the framework suggests standards of achievement that might be applied to each promotional level, cross-referenced to examples of indicative evidence that could be used to demonstrate achievement. The framework was developed with the intention that these criteria, standards and indicative evidence be adapted by individual universities to suit their own context and values. The framework also supports individual teachers in building evidence of their impact in an increasingly complex work environment including traditional research-teaching academics to teaching focused academics and professional staff.

    Participants will obtain a working knowledge of the Australian Teaching Criteria and Standards, and consider how they might be applicable to documenting and evidencing the quality of their teaching.

    Friday, October 23, 2015

    Taking Information Literacy Seriously: Empowering Students to Become Critical Learners

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, October 23, 2015, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Jim Wittebols

    Designed to enable students to become more aware and critical of searching for information online, Information Searching and Analysis is a full course offering that resulted from an exercise in a media studies class challenging students to learn about online sources and begin to sort out trustworthy information from junk. The issues (political economy of information, search personalization, news sourcing) proved to be multilayered and I decided to create a full semester course which explores our tendency to engage in confirmation bias and how search algorithms produce an online version of it, how to read “news” more critically and develop ways to analyze online information sources. Student reactions to the course indicate despite the workload, they learned a lot about the topic, the nature of digital information and searching, and themselves.

    In this workshop, we will begin by surveying our information literacy practices in the classroom. I will then present the logic and key assignments of the course, sharing key materials including the evaluation forms students use in their analyses of websites and news. Participants will then have a chance to explore how these materials might effectively be transferred to their own disciplines. My hope is that the discussion might inspire new initiatives that make information literacy concerns better addressed across campus.

    Monday, November 23, 2015

    Cheating: What Instructors Need to Know

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, November 23, 2015, 01:30 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Danieli Arbex, Erika Kustra, Allyson Skene
    This workshop will explore the new policies and procedures for academic integrity at the University of Windsor. Through case study and discussion, participants will learn positive and proactive solutions to academic dishonesty, including correct procedures to follow when plagiarism is suspected, techniques for determining whether a given assignment is plagiarized, and best practices for interpreting originality reports from the new plagiarism detection service Blackboard’s SafeAssign. Participants will also gain insight into key methods instructors can use to encourage academic integrity, and prevent students from cheating in the first place.

    Friday, December 11, 2015

    Midterm Feedback on Teaching: Do You Have a Plan for the Coming Term?

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, December 11, 2015, 12:00 PM – 01:30 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Claire Lamonica

    We all know the benefits of providing learners with formative feedback, but we may not have considered the benefits of receiving formative feedback on our own teaching. In this CTL “lunch and learn” event, we’ll offer an overview of several options for getting formative feedback on teaching. Come learn more about each, share your own stories, and take a moment to reflect on what might work best for you in the coming term. Now is the time to plan!

    Agenda

    Enjoy a light lunch while we engage in the following activities:

    Introductions
    Come prepared to share your name, academic unit, and any prior experience you have with formative feedback on teaching. (But no experience is required!)

    Overview of Options: Midterm Chats and More
    Presented by Claire Lamonica, CTL Visiting Fellow
    Midterm Chats, more formally known as a “Small Group Instructional Diagnoses” (SGID), offer a consensus-building process that enables instructors to gain valuable insights into student perceptions of a course as a learning experience. You’ll learn about these, but also about several other avenues to formative feedback.

    Discussion
    We’ll spend some time weighing the pro’s and con’s of a variety of methods and considering which might be most appropriate in a variety of settings and situations.

    Reflection
    We’ll conclude with a period of individual reflection during which you will be invited to consider whether or not you’d like to collect midterm feedback next term … and how you might go about doing so.

    Wednesday, January 27, 2016

    Feminist Pedagogy in Theory and Practice

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, January 27, 2016, 11:45 AM – 01:00 PM
    Location: McPherson Lounge
    Instructors: Jane Nicholas , Dusty Johnstone , Renée Bondy, Chris Greig, Susan Holbrook

    Are you interested in broadening your repertoire of teaching strategies and creating a more inclusive, dynamic, and engaged classroom?

    The Centre for Teaching and Learning and Women’s and Gender Studies invite you to attend a lunchtime roundtable on feminist pedagogy. Feminist pedagogy critiques traditional models of teaching and learning, challenges the hierarchy of ways of knowing, honours the existing knowledge of students, renegotiates and reforms the relationship between teacher and student, respects and values the diversity of student experiences, and encourages self-reflexivity as a key aspect of the learning process.

    Jane and Renée, coeditors of Feminist Pedagogies in Higher Education (WLU Press, 2015) together with Chris, Susan, and Dusty, will discuss their engagement with feminist pedagogies, and the triumphs and challenges experienced as they strive to implement feminist and other critical pedagogies in the university classroom. Come join the conversation!

    A light lunch is provided.

    Friday, March 18, 2016

    Informing Your Teaching Practice With Effective SET Visualization Techniques

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, March 18, 2016, 01:30 PM – 04:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: Phil Graniero, Bev Hamilton

    If you're beginning to see that there are useful insights hiding in your course evaluations (SETs), but you're not sure how to unlock the information trapped in those tables of numbers, this workshop is for you. How can you use SETs to examine facets of your teaching and continually improve the classroom experience for your students?

    In this practical workshop, you will work with fellow participants to apply some simple techniques on a sample SET report, reorganizing and visualizing the data to reveal its story and devise follow-up teaching development questions. You will learn some 'on-paper' methods using tools as simple as highlighters and whiteout. You will also learn some 'on-screen' methods by trying some simple recipes from an Excel 'cookbook', so bring a laptop! After the workshop, armed with your new ideas, you'll be ready to unlock the stories hidden in your own SETs.

    Wednesday, July 13, 2016

    Walking in Two Worlds: A New Zealand Approach to Student Engagement

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, July 13, 2016, 01:30 PM – 03:30 PM
    Location: Erie G141
    Instructors: James Paterson
    This teaching workshop provides a snapshot on how a New Zealand teacher has significantly improved student completion and success rates for both Maori and European learners, largely through a thorough understanding of each of his student’s individual journeys. But how is it possible to build robust individual relationships when significant student cultural and social diversity exists and when class sizes continue to expand? This workshop, facilitated by CTL’s current Visiting Fellow James Paterson from Tauranga, New Zealand, examines ways of creating robust relationships by understanding whanuangatanga and “walking in two worlds”, and how these concepts impact on student success. In addition, as a proud Kiwi, husband, dad, teacher and sports fanatic, the facilitator will leave you with a greater understanding of New Zealand, and New Zealand’s contribution to global education.

    Tuesday, October 25, 2016

    Educating for Understanding

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, October 25, 2016, 01:00 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Michael K. Potter

    How can you help your students understand lives and cultures that are quite unlike their own, concepts and theories that seem utterly alien? This workshop will introduce you to ideas you can use to think through the challenging – and rewarding – task of answering that question, and thus create meaningful learning experiences for students that truly broaden their understanding. Although Educating for Understanding will be most directly relevant to faculty members in the arts, humanities and social sciences, many of the techniques and ideas shared will also be useful to those in other disciplines.

    Friday, December 2, 2016

    Making the most of Tests with Multiple Choice Questions: Effective Question Design and the 2-Step/Group Exam

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, December 02, 2016, 01:30 PM – 04:30 PM
    Location: McPherson Lounge
    Instructors: Erika Kustra, Julie Smit
    Multiple choice questions are one of the most common ways to assess students, and yet some of the most difficult to write effectively. In this workshop, we will explore best practices in formulating effective questions, ensuring that questions are appropriately challenging, as well as reliable and valid indicators of student mastery. We will also explore a model for testing students that encourages students to collaboratively and critically engage with multiple choice questions, the 2-Step Exam (also known as the Group Exam). There is evidence that this method of testing students promotes deeper knowledge of the subject matter and reduced reliance on rote memory and guesswork.

    Friday, January 27, 2017

    Using 360 Degree Feedback to Achieve your ‘Personal Best’ in the Classroom

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, January 27, 2017, 09:30 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: McPherson Lounge

    Whether you’re a rookie or at the top of your game, feedback is a critical tool for continued development, improvement and success. 360-degree feedback effectively taps into your students, your colleagues, and yourself (among others) as valuable sources of information that can collectively provide insight into what’s working and what isn’t in your classroom. In this workshop, we will explore a variety of strategies to obtain high quality, practical and comprehensive feedback to help you develop your teaching skills. We will demonstrate different methods for gathering information, including what questions to ask and when to ask them, advantages and disadvantages of different approaches, and tips on how to ensure the feedback meets your needs and goals. We will also identify common challenges to obtaining and analyzing feedback and ways to overcome them, including what to do when feedback conflicts.

    Participants will gain a better sense of how they can draw and use feedback from the full range of sources available to them, implement it effectively in their teaching, and work towards achieving their ‘personal best’ in the classroom.

    Tuesday, February 7, 2017

    Promoting a Culture that Values Teaching: Writing an Effective Proposal for the Windsor-Oakland Conference

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Tuesday, February 07, 2017, 11:30 AM – 01:00 PM
    Location: Lambton 2103
    Instructors: Erika Kustra, Jessica Raffoul
    The purpose of the eleventh annual University of Windsor-Oakland University Teaching and Learning Conference is to explore and celebrate the many ways we can contribute to the enhancement of a culture that values teaching.
    In this interactive workshop, participants will explore what an institutional teaching culture is and why it might matter. Discussion will focus on the common themes that indicate whether a culture values teaching including the evaluation of teaching, educational leadership, and teaching methods. Participants will have the opportunity to brainstorm new conference proposal ideas, or hone existing proposals they are already considering submitting.

    Monday, February 27, 2017

    It doesn’t always have to be this way: why engaging students in content laden large classes needn’t be such hard work

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, February 27, 2017, 01:00 PM – 04:00 PM
    Location: Medical Education Building, Room 3102
    Instructors: Carole L. Davis
    Through case study presentation, activities and discussion this 2 hour workshop will explore some of the challenges Faculty face when needing to cover large amounts of content in core courses with large student enrolment. It is recognised that in the case of courses e.g. nursing and human kinetics which deal with accreditation by professional bodies that much of this content is often non-negotiable. The workshop will address these important concerns and provide participants with a range of approaches and practical techniques that may be used whatever their discipline or context.

    Wednesday, March 1, 2017

    Probably one of the most important things teachers do: The why, how and when of giving students feedback for learning

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Wednesday, March 01, 2017, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Medical Education Building, Room 3102
    Instructors: Carole L. Davis
    Come to a workshop which encourages participants to focus on student feedback and its relationship with assessment. You will be required to think about your own current practices - what is working well, what is working fairly well but needs some tweaking and what is working less well. The workshop is intended to be provocative , broaden horizons, provide some reframing of the familiar whilst emphasising that there are often different options which are context specific. Throughout we will keep sight of the relationship between feedback, cognition, effective learning and confidence.

    Monday, April 24, 2017

    9:15 AM

    Re-thinking Foundational Courses: Engaging Science Students through Collaborative Course Design

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, April 24, 2017, 09:15 AM – 10:30 AM
    Location: Medical Education Building, Room 3102
    Instructors: Tim McKay

    The emerging information age provides unprecedented opportunities for rethinking our approach to teaching large-scale foundational courses in Science as well as other disciplines. We can abandon the passive lecture halls, generic instruction, standardized exams, and expensive textbooks of the 20th century, and build inclusive, engaging points of entry into virtually any discipline or topic.

    The University of Michigan is currently engaged in a campus-wide Foundational Course Initiative to establish a new, 21st century collaborative approach to the creation and instruction of these courses. Faculty, staff, and students from departments are joining together with instructional consultants from the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching to form Collaborative Course Design teams and to design, develop, and deliver next generation versions of foundational courses. In this session, participants will learn the details of this multi-year project and discuss the strategies that they might employ in rebuilding their own foundational courses using the best evidence-based teaching methods to engage and motivate students, the most appropriate and effective technology solutions, and an assessment toolkit focused on measuring and improving student learning.

    11:00 AM

    Why Learning Analytics: Solving Your Teaching Problems

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Monday, April 24, 2017, 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Medical Education Building, Room 3102
    Instructors: Tim McKay
    The 21st century began amidst an information revolution that promises to change higher education in a variety of ways. Many of these changes have already happened: information is increasingly online, lectures are being flipped, and students are distracted in class by social media. But while some changes seem positive and others not so much, it is an ongoing question as to how specific changes impact student learning and engagement, and how faculty might work towards improving their classroom experiences. Harnessing information technology for learning analytics is one approach to answering this question. We already gather rich and extensive information about student performance, activity, status, and engagement. Analyzing and using that data effectively can give us new insights to optimize our education of an increasingly diverse student body, increase personalization, and ultimately to create much greater student motivation and engagement.

    Friday, September 22, 2017

    Cheating: What Instructors Need to Know

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, September 22, 2017, 09:30 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Medical Education Building, Room 3102
    Instructors: Danieli Arbex, Erika Kustra, Allyson Skene, Lorna Stolarchuk
    This workshop will explore the new policies and procedures for academic integrity at the University of Windsor. Through case study and discussion, participants will learn positive and proactive solutions to academic dishonesty, including correct procedures to follow when plagiarism is suspected, techniques for determining whether a given assignment is plagiarized, and best practices for interpreting originality reports from the new plagiarism detection service Blackboard’s SafeAssign. Participants will also gain insight into key methods instructors can use to encourage academic integrity, and prevent students from cheating in the first place.

    Friday, November 3, 2017

    Presence and presentation: Engaging your students in the classroom

    Registration for this event is now closed.
    Schedule: Friday, November 03, 2017, 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
    Location: Medical Education Building, Room 3102

    Have you ever caught your students zoning out in class or focusing on Facebook instead of the lecture? You’re not alone!

    In this interactive workshop, you will learn verbal, physical, and media related techniques that will help enhance your ability to engage students and deliver a message. You will leave with a toolbox full of quick and simple communication strategies that will help you improve your stage presence, better manage your classroom space, and focus your students’ attention. You will also explore the use of visuals and other storytelling elements to set the tone of your lecture, as well as some tips for ensuring that your choice of technology works for you.